Create a new account

It's simple, and free.

Buddhism

1. Abe discusses the universe in two modes, as applied to the physical, objective whole, and second, as applied to the subjective experience of an individual. Both the physical universe and the human being are formulated as attributes of existence, such as "body, sensations, perceptions, volitions, and acts of consciousness." Commonsense external (objective) and internal (subjective) experience shows that both physical and individual world "are in a state of flux," so that "there is nothing behind them that can be called a permanent Self (Atman), individuality, or anything that can in reality be called 'I'" (90). These factors of existence are called skandhas, "variously translated as 'groups,' 'aggregates,' or 'heaps.' . . . form or matter (rupa [= body according to Abe, above]), feelings (vedana [= sensations]), ideas (samjna [= perceptions]), volitions (samskara [as above]), and consciousness (vijnana [= acts of consciousness above])" (Pederson 322). The idea that arises from this is the Buddhist doctrine of anatman (no-soul), or no-Self. Anatman is an aspect of all phenomena of the world, which is, however, just as much in flux as the permanent (but really not permanent, as the organism is constantly changing) self. Thus self and no-self alike are in permanent flux, the point being a metaphysical one, that they elude classification as essential and enduring. The notion of the universe being in flux really means that one condition of experience gives way to the next. Thus, as Abe says (90): "When this is, that is; this arising, that arises; when this is not, that is not; this ceasing, that ceases." What is elsewhere called a chain of causation, or a chain of cause and effect, comes down to is an explanation of craving or desire to be associated with the material experience of the universe. Or, to put it another way, each condition of experience passes into the next in a way that demonstrates that actions and thoughts have consequen...

Page 1 of 9 Next >

More on Buddhism...

Loading...
APA     MLA     Chicago
Buddhism. (1969, December 31). In LotsofEssays.com. Retrieved 17:26, December 07, 2021, from https://www.lotsofessays.com/viewpaper/1706989.html